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JEWISH JOURNAL

Week of Dec. 22-28, 1988

 
'Life:  A True Story'
Man finds unusual way to tell children of Holocaust
by Alan Kravitz
     Steven V. Gure, a Holocaust survivor and former New York City police officer, has found a rather unorthodox way of communicating with his children -- he's written a book about his life.
     Life:  A True Story chronicles Gure's life, from his birth into a wealthy Jewish family in Lithuania to his years as a police officer in the Big Apple.
     Gure was 5 when the Nazis took over Lithuania.  He and his older sister survived, but the rest of the Gure family did not.
     "I remember a time when they (Nazis) placed all the residents of the ghetto in a field.  They wanted to take all the children," Gure said.  "My mother had me in ditch.  She covered me up to protect me.  I was laying there for what seemed like hours.  Memories like that stay with you."
     But Gure always found it difficult to talk about those memories with his three children.  That's the main reason for the book.  As Gure says in the book's preface "At this stage of my life, I would like my children to know me -- or more about me.  They might benefit from it.  After all, they stem from me."
     When Gure and his sister came to the United States, they spent most of their time in orphanages.  Gure eventually joined the Army and started a career as a police officer.
     Gure said he never had a previous desire to be a police officer, but he took the job "to put bread on my table.  The job was available and I took it."
     Gure doesn't know how much bread the book will put on his table, but that's not a major priority with him.
     "If I make a profit, fine," Gure said.  "But the main reason I wrote the book was to communicate with my offspring."
     Gure and wife Ruth have three children, Scott, Michele and Michael.  In the book, Gure devotes several chapters to Scott, who had a troubled youth during the 1970's.  In the book, Gure describes the anguish he and Ruth went through as their son faced a possible jail sentence.  Today, Scott lives in California and works in the electronics field.
     "He's a fine young man," said Gure of his son.
     Scott approves of the book and has read portions of his father's work, but could not yet read the sections which were devoted to him, said the Gures.
     "It was like opening up an old wound," Ruth said.  "In time, he may re-think this and say 'Dad, I'd like to have the book back.'"
     Gure spent about one year writing the book.  He had no trouble recalling the events he wrote about in the book.
     "The experiences I have had in my life were so unique that they were very vivid when it came time to write about them," Gure said.
     He does not plan to write any more books.
     "I had one story to tell.  That's it.  I never want to experience what I experienced again in my life," Gure said.
     Gure and his wife Ruth moved to Florida in 1988.  The family lives in Coral Springs and Coconut Creek and Gure, 52, now works as a patrol officer in Highland Beach.
     "I am thrilled to G-d," Gure said, "to be alive and living well in Florida."

 


Steven V. Gure
2402 Episa Avenue
Coconut Creek, FL 33063
Phone (954) 971-6633
Fax  (954) 972-6927
steven@lifeatruestory.com

sales@lifeatruestory.com